"Aegean"    2010
6.5 x 13 x 11.5 (h) inches
Cast porcelain with inlaid marbleized panels, oxidation fired, cone 7
Published in Ceramics Montly,  January 2011
“Green Wedge Quilt”   2010
9.5 x 6 x 1 inches
Marbleized porcelain, assembled from sections, press molded, oxidation fired, cone 7
Published in Ceramics Montly,  January 2011
“Blue Marble Quilt”  2010
12.5 x 10 x 1.25
Marbleized porcelain, assembled from sections, press molded, oxidation fired, cone 7
“Blue Marble Quilt” (back side detail),  2010
12.5 x 10 x 1.25
Marbleized porcelain, assembled from sections, press molded, oxidation fired, cone 7
Kubachi Emerald"  2010
Slip-cast porcelain, underglaze, glaze, oxidation fired to cone 7
12 x 5h inches
"Igneous Deco"  2007
5.5 x 6.5 x 15h inches
Slip-cast porcelain, slips, glaze, oxidation fired, cone 7
HOMEPORTFOLIOWORKSHOPSARCHIVE
PUBLICATIONSCONTACT

"Silent Eddy"
2012
19" Diameter x 3.5" H

"Silent Eddy" details (above) and with decoration completed prior to glaze application (left).

My affinity for fish, especially on plates, goes back to my student days in Kansas City.  My professor, Victor Babu, had a blue and white Japanese bowl with fish decorated in the middle.  
The Ming Dynasty potters did fish superbly.

​O​ccasionally I decorate a plate with a trio of fish.  Luckily Koi fish, joined with scrolling vines and leaves, have a friendly, serene, and beautiful quality.

"Kimono"  2012
Press molded and slip cast porcelain, polychrome glazes, oxidation fired, cone 7
6.5 x 13 x 11.5 (h) inches
This piece was exhibited in "Ecumene: Global Interface in American Ceramics" at the conference of The International Academy of Ceramics In Santa Fe.  It was also featured on the cover of the catalogue for the exhibition. 

Of the more than 20,000 pots I have produced over 30 years, I count this as one of the five best.  In a real sense it defies explanation, it came about by following no pattern of action or conception, just a notion of placing marbleized sheets in the mold and trusting it would work visually.  Then I needed my wife Perola to help me figure out the glazing.  She suggested the three-color pattern.  The process of drawing the pattern of squares, staggered like bricks, on the pot, and then applying the three colors took nine hours.  When it came out of the kiln, it was one of the great moments in being an artist - the result was far beyond my expectation, beyond me.  In a real sense that is where it came from - beyond.  I was the lucky participant in the process in which what is beyond got funnelled through both me and the process.

After this piece was fired I was looking at it.  It suggested something I had seen before, but could not recall.  Two things eventually emerged - fabrics from 1920's women's dresses, and Japanese Kimonos.  Kimono just seemed to fit the feeling of this teapot.  That link between fabric and ceramics appears in many cultures such as Japan, Persia, and England.
"Ooze of Blues"
2012
14.5 x 4 x 9 (h) inches


The two patterns used to decorate this piece are reversed from one side to the other along a geometric 'L' shape.  Another geometric checkerboard pattern is the understructure of the 3-color color scheme.  The distinctions between the geometric structures is blurred by the oozing cascade of glazes and underglaze.

From each side the visual read and feeling is different, with the handle and spout each assigned one of the two patterns.


"Shadow Lake"
2010
20 x 11 x 5h inches (h) 

Views of two views (above & below, and detail (right) 
Process images below
Shadow Lake is a piece I made in 2009.  It is a form that I have been wanting to make for some time.  Like with all glazing that I do, I never know what I am going to do until something occurs in relation to the piece.  This one was sitting in the studio and one evening a shadow from the light was cast across the interior.  I then repositioned the piece in several ways, dividing the form by how the shadow was cast.  What worked was to divide the form so that from one side the form appears only white, and from the other, only charcoal grey.

The webbed netting of slip trailing on the surface of the form reminds me of of stockings on a smooth, yet curvaceous leg. 

This is the rough mold just before sanding and  drying in preparation for casting.
Shadow lake prior to the shadow. I love how the indirect light looks on the surface, showing all the contours of the form.
Chocolate Addiction"
2010
6.5 x 11 x 13.5h inches (h) inches

​CHOCOLATE!  Manganese give a stunning metaphor of chocolate melting all over this piece.  If you have a regular, compulsive and, yes, sometimes overwhelming need to eat chocolate, this teapot  might well accompany your tastings.
The various stages of developing the teapot for "Kimono", "Aegean", "Cirque" and "Chocolate Addiction".  Clockwise: The template armature for the various parts, the body and lid  prototypes on the armature, the spout and handle prototypes, the completed mold for the body, and the body and handle molds.

When the plaster molds are first dried, they have a seductive sculptural quality - pure white, smooth, and unblemished.  After they have been used for a while, they look more like an old hammer that has been used by several generations of builders.  Like a hammer, or any tool that is used well, the result can can be unexpected beauty.
"Tribute to Ken Price"

11.5 x x3 x 8 h inches
Marbleized press molded and cast porcelain, glaze



Just after graduate school I worked for Ken Price.  He lived nearby and wanted some molds made.  Education sometimes happens by just being around a master and watching them work.  This was true with Ken.  Occasionally he would say something about what was going on with the work.  

The most enduring statement was uttered while he was applying layers of paint to a piece.  "It only gets really good when I get into trouble." 

That statement has resonated over the years, especially when something in the work was "in trouble".  Those moments require a creative gesture, beyond knowledge, habit, and previous success.  That is the working ethic I engage at each step of the process.  That turns each step of the making process in to a surprise beyond my expectation and knowledge.

Thanks Ken.  You were a good man.



Dessert Bowls
5" x 5" x 3.5"
"Igneous Deco"
7 x 6 x 15.5h inches
Cast porcelain, slip trailing, glaze 


As a young kid growing up in the mountains of Colorado, and even now, I enjoy seeing plants growing out of rocks, and natural springs that seep up and  out through cracks in rocks pouring across the surface of the stone, without the source being evident.  Those elements are in play in the surface of this riff on Art Deco vases.  

Marbleized Tumblers

Making these pieces is a delight.  They are a form of "spin art" like they used to have at amusement parks.  I am sure that the whole premise of "spin art" was exploiting the Jackson Pollock phenomena.  

These tumblers are made by placing the mold on a wheel and spinning it very fast.  While it is spinning I pour white and different colored casting slips into the mold.  The results are always varied based on the quantity of each slip, on the fluidity of the slip, the speed of the wheel, and how quickly I pour the slip into the mold.  I like the variation that the conditions impart to the finished pieces.

Portfolio
“Crustacean”  2010
17 x 9 x 8 (h) inches
Press molded and slip cast porcelain, underglaze, polychrome glazes, oxidation fired, cone 7
Published in Ceramics Montly,  January 2011


I love this piece.  My wife and I call the form "the crab claw", hence the title of the piece.  

From the outset I knew the paper cut-out shape would make an unusually grand covered dish.

The prototype took days to get right.  I sculped it taller, shorter, narrower at the bottom and top. Nothing was working.  Eventually I just added lots more clay and began again.  As I carved away I was aware that the form had to feel full, as a slightly squeezed ballon might look and feel like.  That exagerated fullness, in conjunction with the marbleized panels, light sponging and five colors of glaze make this piece sing in a way I like.

"Continental Drift'   2012
25 x 11 x 3.5 (h) inches
Press molded and slip cast porcelain, polychrome glazes, oxidation fired, cone 7

"Cirque"    2012
6.5 x 13 x 11.5 (h) inches
Cast porcelain, oxidation fired, cone 7
"Yellow Marble Zebra"   2012
25 x 11 x 3.5 (h) inches
Press molded and slip cast porcelain, polychrome glazes, oxidation fired, cone 7

"Marble Eddy"  2012
Press molded and slip cast porcelain, oxidation fired, cone 7
25 x 16 x 3.2 inches
Exhibited at "Overthrown: Clay Without Limits" Denver Art Museum
“Green Marble Quilt”  2010
9.5 x 6.3 x 1 inches
Marbleized porcelain, assembled from sections, press molded, oxidation fired, cone 7
HOMEPORTFOLIOWORKSHOPSARCHIVE
PUBLICATIONSCONTACT